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for the pentagon and fluctuations in global energy prices can have dramatic, dramatic effects on defense spending. for every $10 increase in a barrel of oil it costs the american military annually an extra $1.3 billion. recognizing the potential instability that d.o.d.'s current energy needs can cause, military experts from across the various branches of the armed services have begun looking at ways to cut energy use and find energy alternative. now, i continued to hear all of this discussion about how this is somehow a green agenda and it's a suber havesive plot and it's being forced on a resistant president. and i just want to take a minute or two, mr. president, and say i don't think anything could be further from the truth and just wanted to describe for a moment why i feel that way. first, those who oppose defense energy initiatives often argue in today's fiscal environment, the country can't afford to waste money on energy programs when it's necessary to provide for our nation's security. i don't believe, mr. president, it is an either/or proposition, because my view is that an investment i
brought all these cases to the attention of the pentagon. the secretary of the army responded with an assurance that our flag would be flown at army installations whenever the flags of the states are on display. and many of the individual installations i mentioned took corrective action when i contacted them. but despite this response, i continue to receive reports of situations where territorial flags are forgotten. see, the problem is there is no uniform regulation governing the inclusion of the flags of the district of columbia and the territories, though the secretary -- army secretary said it is the policy of the air force, the coast guards, the marines and the navy to let local commanders have the discretion to display state flags. with or without the flags of the territories on their installations. i have requested that the service modify their regulations to include our flags but no action has been taken. and i believe it should not be at the discretion of individual base commanders to decide to exclude any part of the united states. or the fighting men and women from
on social media sites. >> recently vice president joe biden was in attendance at a pentagon announcement of a new virginia class fast-attack navy submarine that'll be called the uss delaware. it's expected to be launch inside 2018. speaking at this 20-minute briefing were second lady jill biden, navy secretary ray mabus and delaware senator tom carper. >> thank you all for coming today to the navy ship naming announcement. today's briefing will consist of statements only, there will be no questions and answers following the statement. along with secretary of the navy ray mabus, today we are honored to be joined by second lady, dr. jill biden, and her special guest, her husband, vice president biden. [laughter] senator tom carper and lieutenant governor matt denn. thank you all for being here today, and if you're all ready, i will turn it over to secretary ray mabus, our 75th secretary of the navy. >> well, thank you all for being here. i particularly want to thank dr. biden for being here, senior senator from delaware, tom carper, and the lieutenant governor of delaware, matt denn. and,
in places like the pentagon and headquarter command like central command and working at afghanistan and iraq and other headquarters and there are probably about 2000 or 3000 navy seals. they started in 1962 by president john f. kennedy. the reason why he started it is because what president kennedy wanted to do, he wanted to have dedicated and highly trained forces. those he could put into difficult situations who could not only respond tactically but who can also respond and be thoughtful about working in dangerous situations. his theory that led to the development of this was called a flexible response. the idea was the united states needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner. we needed to be rid able to respond in a flexible manner. that's what led to the development. >> [inaudible question] >> the question was what i care to comment about the latest book on the bin laden rate. you know, i don't think it was a good book to write. i will tell you why. one is that i have tremendous respect for admiral mcraven. he was a four-star navy seal admiral and he took over from eric olsen and
're working at places like the pentagon, central command and working in afghanistan and iraq and some of the headquarters, and so there's probably about 2,000 to 3,000 navy seals. they were started on january 1, 1962, by president john f. kennedy. and the reason why he started the seals was he wanted to have a force -- a seal, you may know, stands for sea, air and land commando. and what president kennedy wanted to do was he wanted to have a force of people, a dedicated and high will hi-trained force that -- highly-trained force that he could put in deadly situations who could not only respond tactically, but could also respond and use their minds and be thoughtful about working in some very difficult, dangerous situations. and his theory, the international relations thief ri that led to the development of the sale team was called the flexible response. and the idea was that the united states needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner, not just using nuclear weapons which was kind of the theory at the time. we needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner to any threat that
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been -- >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. h
of power today, it is the size of the pentagon and those devil is actually had a bigger problem than us. but i would be interested in when you're thinking about policy, do you look at that the source of leverage, or did this restrain american options in terms of what you can do? >> with respect to the deficit and debt of the national security liability, we need our senior leadership and the ability to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so, we have a requirement to do so. the requirement and foundation of national power is ultimately economic in terms of global influence. and in terms of supporting the military. we have, i think, members of the house will step up in the coming months. >> how did you look at your surplus of the united states? do they say that we have america under control because of the treasury? >> superposition to the united states is very important. it is very decisive. so there is no intention for us with this economic relationship. >> i'm going to open it up to the floor. we have four microphones around the room. josh grogan is over here. >> thank you very muc
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7